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HYDRA

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ASTRONOMNICAL PERSPECTIVE

ASTROLOGICAL PERSPECTIVE

Hydra Constellation spans from

Position in the Year 2000       Astronomical Name             Star Common Name                   Magnitude            Orb

             

Conjunct alignment with our Sun and Earth occurs every year around until .

(day-time mediation in the Northern Hemisphere)

and the Opposite Alignment from around  until 

(night-time meditation in the Northern Hemisphere).

*Note the alignments are the other way around for Southern Hemisphere.

To check on the exact dates, search HERE for Sun returning to Hydra Stars Astrological degrees listed below.

You can also use our free calculator HERE to see if Hydra stars are present in your natal Astro chart or on the day of your interest.

MYTHOLOGY

Hydra constellation as depicted by the Greeks is an adaptation of the Babylonian constellation MUL.DINGIR.MUŠ, which was one of the two Babylonian constellations that represented a serpent and loosely corresponded to Hydra. The other constellation corresponded to the Greek constellation Serpens. The Babylonian constellation represented a mythological hybrid of a serpent, bird and lion.

Hydra constellation is usually associated with the second of Heracles’ labours in Greek mythology. Hydra was a giant multi-headed creature fathered by the monster Typhon and Echidna, who was half-woman, half-serpent. The dragon Ladon, that guarded the garden of the Hesperides, was Hydra’s brother. The dragon, also defeated by Heracles, is represented by the constellation Draco, while the hero is commemorated by the constellation Hercules.

In mythology, Hydra had nine heads and one of them was immortal. The celestial Hydra is depicted with only one head, presumably the immortal one.

The monster lived near the town of Lerna, where it ravaged the land. Heracles, faced with a difficult task, first aimed flaming arrows into the Hydra’s lair and smoked it out. Then he fought with it, smashing the creature’s heads one by one with his club. Every time he smashed one, two new heads would grow in its place. While the two fought, Heracles was distracted by a crab, which crawled out of the swamp and went for his foot. Heracles did away with the crab and Hera placed it among the stars as the constellation Cancer.

Heracles was able to defeat the Hydra when his charioteer Iolaus helped him by burning the stumps of each head that Heracles struck off, and eventually Heracles cut off the immortal head and buried it under a rock. He dipped his arrows in Hydra’s poisonous blood, which would eventually lead to his own end.

In a different myth, the constellation Hydra is associated with the water snake on which Apollo’s crow blamed its tardiness. The god had sent the bird, represented by the constellation Corvus, to fetch him some water in a cup. The cup is associated with the constellation Crater. The crow was distracted by a fig tree and stopped to feast. When it finally returned to Apollo, it said the water snake was to blame, but the god saw through the bird’s lie and punished it by placing it into the sky. Apollo also turned the water snake and the cup into constellations. In the sky, the water snake (Hydra) eternally prevents the crow (Corvus) from drinking out of the cup (Crater).

HISTORICAL 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HYDRA STARSEEDS PERSPECTIVE

CHANNELLED TEXTS RECOMMENDATIONS - BOOKS BY

  • Fixed Stars and Constellations in Astrology, Vivian E. Robson, 1923, p.133.

  • Star Names: Their Lore and Meaning, Richard H. Allen, 1889, p.31-34.

  • Astronomica, Manilius, Book 5, 1st century A.D., p.351.

  • The Witness of the Stars, E. W. Bullinger, 22. Andromeda (the Chained Woman).

  • Watermarked images used with permission, source www.vashta.com

 

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JULIA'S VIDEOS ON THE TOPIC

Julia made a wonderful video about Hydra HERE                                                                and HERE.

FURTHER STUDY OPPORTUNITY

If you feel excited about this topic and would like to learn more we invite you to explore our online courses:

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